Understanding the Trans Pacific Partnership

In two articles published in Idealog magazine Stephen outlines what’s at stake for New Zealand in TPP.

Read these articles here and here.

NZ and Japan – an added value relationship: the implications of TPP

In a speech to the Japan NZ Business Council in Tomakomai,Japan, Stephen outlines the implications of TPP for the Japan/NZ relationship.

Read the speech here.

TPP – where to from here (and how did we get here anyway?)

Read Stephen’s speech to the Wellington branch of the NZ Institute for International Affairs (NZIIA) here

As we look at where we have got to with TPP, we see a deal which is at last coming together in its final form.

To un-pack all this today and to help explain ‘where to from here’ I’d like to focus on three areas – why we set out on this journey, where we are now, and where things might take us in coming months.

 

Jacobi on 3 News. The TPPA ‘will benefit’ NZ exporters

Jacobi on 3 News. The TPPA ‘will benefit’ NZ exporters

Jacobi on 3 News. The TPPA 'will benefit' NZ exporters

Ending the TPP ‘endgame’

Read Stephen’s commentary in the New Zealand Herald on the TPP negotiations and why they are good for New Zealand business – here.

Endgame is a play by the absurd dramatist Samuel Beckett. It’s also how the anticipated last hurrah for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations in Maui last week was described. And there was quite a lot of the absurd as pressure mounted on negotiators and the wildest speculation about developments circulated in the media back here.

 

 

Jacobi talks to Māori Television’s Media Take about the TPP

Watch Jacobi on the TPP – Media Take

Stephen Jacobi talks to Maori Television about the TPP

Trade and resilient agri-business

Stephen spoke to the Federated Farmers’ annual conference in Wellington on 2 July.  Read his speech here.

Resilience is about equipping farmers to survive and prosper in the face of external shocks and stresses – be they climate-related, or pests and diseases, or to do with currency or some other economic factor.

Trade agreements that level the playing field have enhanced New Zealand farmers’ international competitiveness, and greatly expanded our options in terms of diversified markets.

More open trade has given New Zealand farmers strength and flexibility to withstand the shocks of drought, or events like PSA, or a high dollar, or going head to head with massively subsidised competitors.

It is trade that links food supply from New Zealand with rising demand in global markets and the changing needs of global consumers.

Emerging trade agreements

Stephen spoke to the Primary Industry Summit in Wellington on 25 May.  Read his speech here.

I’d like to start today by asking the question – why do we seek negotiate trade agreements in the first place, especially when they seem so hard to I’ll then give you a sense of where I, as business observer, think some of the more current FTA negotiations are up to.

I’d also like to venture some thoughts about what all this might mean for the primary industries.

The case for trade

Stephen addresses the Nelson branch of the NZ Institute of International Affairs here.

I’m here to make the case for trade but in some respects there is no need to make such a case here in Nelson.

This region lives by its exports of seafood, wood, horticulture, wine, meat and dairy products.

Can there really be any debate about trade in a place like this?

Is there still hope for TPP?

Stephen assesses the prospects for the Trans Pacific Partnership in 2015 here.

The big question for trade policy watchers as we start a new year is whether the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations might be concluded.  Last year I thought negotiations could be concluded by April.  I was wrong.  This year I can make no such prediction, save one – if TPP is not finished soon, we may need to move on to something else.